The Scarlet Letter: A – for Adultery, Antinomian, or America Itself?

Historically speaking, whenever The Scarlet Letter has been banned or challenged, the objections have come from all directions. Nathaniel Hawthorne’s name may be inextricably linked with the Puritans, but he clearly had a complicated relationship with his subject matter. He’s renowned for his deep symbolism, psychological insight, and the “mystical blackness” that pervades his work. So, The Scarlet Letter is about much more than a misbehaving minister.

2022-09-05T12:52:43-05:00By |Banned Books|0 Comments

The Scarlet Letter: A – for Adultery, Antinomian, or America itself / Endnotes

[1] James, Henry. “Hawthorne.” In English Men of Letters. Edited by John Morley. (London: Macmillan and Co., 1879), 6. [2] Brooks, Rebecca Beatrice. “The Life of Nathaniel Hawthorne.” History of Massachusetts Blog. Sept 15, 2011; “The Paternal Ancestors of Nathaniel Hawthorne: Introduction.” Hawthorne In Salem. hawthorneinsalem.org; Hawthorne, Nathaniel. The Scarlet Letter. (New York: Penguin Books, ... Read More.

2022-09-05T12:49:45-05:00By |Banned Books|0 Comments

The Catcher in the Rye: A Twentieth-century Jeremiad

Salinger’s novel is said to have been “yanked out of American schools more than almost any other title.” There's a laundry list of reasons why, but essentially because its protagonist challenges the status quo. But Salinger’s book is about much more than the antics of a rebellious teenager. The Catcher in the Rye is a re-fashioned jeremiad.

2022-03-11T09:41:02-06:00By |Banned Books|0 Comments

The Catcher in the Rye: A Twentieth-century Jeremiad_endnotes

Salinger’s novel is said to have been “yanked out of American schools more than almost any other title.” There's a laundry list of reasons why, but essentially because its protagonist challenges the status quo. But Salinger’s book is about much more than the antics of a rebellious teenager. The Catcher in the Rye is a re-fashioned jeremiad.

2022-03-11T09:42:57-06:00By |Banned Books|0 Comments

The Lottery: Who’s the Lucky Scapegoat?

Who knows what was going through Shirley Jackson’s head as she walked home from the market, just before she put her daughter Joanne in the playpen, the frozen vegetables in the freezer, and The Lottery down on paper. But, the short story she wrote that afternoon ends with a famously shocking plot twist, one that has provoked controversy since the instant it appeared in The New Yorker.

2022-02-26T14:01:15-06:00By |Banned Books|0 Comments
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